Playing with my camera in St. John’s

Colours

Colours I

Colours II

Colours II

Colours III

Colours III

Colours IV

Colours IV

Rocks Meet Water

Rocks Meet Water

Anchor I

Anchor I

Anchor II

Anchor II

My Anchor

My Anchor

Brick Pattern

Brick Pattern

Imperfection

Imperfection

Light

Light

Bollards

Bollards

Window Pans

Window Pans

Wellies on a Sunny Day: New Fashion Statements

Wellies on a Sunny Day: New Fashion Statements

Workers on Water St.

Workers on Water St.

The Rock: Part III

These photographs from St.John’s focus on two of the most important landmarks in the area: Signal Hill and Cape Spear.

Cape Spear is the easternmost point in North America. My coming from the Yukon where Canada’s westernmost point is located made this visit all the more interesting. Below is the oldest surviving lighthouse in Newfoundland, located at Cape Spear. Construction began in 1834:

Old Lighthouse at Cape Spear

Old Lighthouse at Cape Spear

Below is the new operating lighthouse at Cape Spear:

New Lighthouse at Cape Spear

New Lighthouse at Cape Spear

Notice the outhouse hanging over the edge, no longer in operation I might add. Yikes!

No need of a "honey-dipper" on that one

No need of a "honey-dipper" on that one

There are trails around the harbour and narrows that have breathtaking views. Here I am sitting on the stone wall just below Cabot Tower overlooking The Narrows. You can get a peek of Cape Spear in the background.

Sitting atop Signal Hill

Sitting atop Signal Hill

Looking back toward the harbour from Signal Hill:

St.John's Harbour from Signal Hill

St.John's Harbour from Signal Hill

Cabot Tower atop Signal Hill, near where the first trans-Atlantic wireless message was received by Guglielmo Marconi in 1901. (I wonder if they called him Elmo).

Cabot Tower at Signal Hill

Cabot Tower at Signal Hill

Some of the surplus stones from the building of the Cabot Tower along with those from the recently demolished St. George’s Hospital were used for the houses below. The builder and designer of the Cabot Tower, Samuel Garrett, built these homes for his daughters. They were connected with doorways in the inside walls and are now referred to as the Temperance Street Houses or the Samuel Garrett Houses:

Temperance Street Houses - compr

A close-up view of the stonework on Cabot Tower:

Brickwork on Cabot Tower

Stonework on Cabot Tower

The Rock: Part II

As promised, here are a few more pictures from Newfoundland.

The first pic is of a little fishing port, Bauline, and I had to spend some time searching online to make sure it was, indeed, where I thought it was. Really, I need to start taking notes when taking pictures as I end up not remembering where exactly the photos are from.

Little Fishing Port (Bauline?)

Bauline

This second photo was taken near the same place as the boat ladder, and again, I’m not quite sure where it was taken. It’s at some little cove on a sideroad off of Hwy 60. If anyone out there knows where this is, let me know.

Shipwreck

Shipwreck

We stopped for lunch and sat out on the deck of a little family-owned restaurant in Spaniard’s Bay. I had Jigs Pie (a variation of Jigs Dinner, sort of a pot pie) and my hunny had Fish ‘N Brewis.

Spaniard's Bay

Spaniard's Bay

More pictures to come.

The Rock: Part I

When telling people where we were travelling from this summer, most people were curious about the Yukon. After all, most Canadians are clueless about the North. After describing this wonderful place we live in, I often talked about the story most Yukoners are familiar with. They planned on visiting for a week, a summer, a year, and end up never leaving. “You’ll never go back if you come for a visit.” It was only in Newfoundland where people would respond, ” Oh yes I would!”

I should have known. Silly me. It’s obvious how they feel just by taking a peek at many traditional Newfoundland songtitles:

  • Back Home in  Newfoundland
  • Back in Newfoundland
  • Come Home to Newfoundland
  • Down Home in Newfoundland
  • Gotta Get Back to Newfie
  • Hills of My Newfoundland Home
  • I’m Coming Home to You Newfoundland
  • My Home Newfoundland
  • My Newfoundland Home
  • Newfoundland Is Calling, Welcome Home Again

Indeed, as we are proud of our adopted home, they are too of their native home. So, here’s my ode to Newfoundland:

We had planned on taking the ferry over to Bell Island. Unfortunately, we didn’t make it. So I’ll just have to stare at this photograph I took from a distance…until my next trip.

Bell Island

Bell Island

Somewhere north of Torbay off the highway (60)…a little sideroad….cove? (I really need to take notes when taking pictures), I’m not sure where, there was this boat ladder. Maybe there’s a more accurate term, but I’d never seen one before.

Boat Ladder

Boat Ladder

And what would be photos of Newfoundland without Jellybean Row? They kind of remind me of the Smarty Houses in Inuvik, NWT.

NL Jellybean Houses 2-compr.

Jellybean Row

Jellybean Row

Jellybean Row

NL Overlooking the narrows-compr.

Overlooking the Narrows

St. John's Harbour

St. John's Harbour

Suited up and ready for a tour

Suited up and ready for a tour

Dave suited up for the tour

Dave suited up for the tour

I should mention that we hired O’Brien’s Whale and Bird Tours. We didn’t see any whales. Apparently the capelin were late coming, and the whales rely on these for food. Regardless, we had a blast. We were on a Zodiak with two other couples, and I think our captain gave us an extra thrill with all the bouncing in the waves. I’ve never laughed so hard. As for the more serious stuff, we did see puffins and other sea birds.

Puffins and other sea birds

Puffins and other sea birds

I’ll stop here, and I’ll post more photos on a later post.

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